Active Directory 2008: DNS Debug Logging Facts…

Debug Logging Facts

Debug logging allows you to log the packets sent and received by a DNS server. Debug logging is disabled by default, and because it is resource intensive, you should only activate it temporarily when you need more specific detailed information about server performance.

To configure debug logging, use the Debug Logging tab in the DNS server properties dialog. The table below describes the debug logging options.

Option Description
Packet direction This option allows you to log   packets that are either sent or received or both using two options:

  • Use the Outgoing        setting to log packets sent.
  • Use the Incoming        setting to log packets received.
Packet contents This option allows you to log   packets based on their contents. You have the following options:

  • Use the Queries/Transfers        setting to log packets that contain standard query or transfer data.
  • Use the Updates        setting to log packets that contain dynamic updates.
  • Use the Notifications        setting to log packets that contain notifications.
Transport protocol This option allows you to log   packets based on the protocol used to transport the packet. You can select UDP   or TCP or both.
Packet type This option allows you to log   packets that are either Response packets (characterized by a QR bit   set to 0 in the DNS message header) or Request packets (characterized   by a QR bit set to 1 in the DNS message header).
Other options This option has the following   settings:

  • Use the Details        setting to log the packet contents in addition to the summary        information.
  • Use the Filter packets by        IP address to log packets sent from a specific IP address, or        packets sent to a specific IP address.
File path and name This option allows you to specify   the log file name and location. For example:

  • The file name dns.log saves        the log file as systemroot\System32\DNS\dns.log.
  • The path temp\dns.log saves        the log file as systemroot\temp\dns.log.
Maximum size (bytes) This option allows you to specify   the maximum size you wish the log file to reach. When the log file reaches   its maximum size, the DNS server overwrites the oldest packet information   with new packet information. If you do not specify a log size, the log file   can take up large amounts of disk space.

 

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